Would you jump? Or would you chicken out? Our objective in making this film was something of a psychology experiment: We sought to capture people facing a difficult situation, to make a portrait of humans in doubt. We’ve all seen actors playing doubt in fiction films, but we have few true images of the feeling in documentaries. To make them, we decided to put people in a situation powerful enough not to need any classic narrative framework. A high dive seemed like the perfect scenario. Through an online advertisement, we found 67 people who had never been on a 10-meter (about 33 feet) diving tower before, and had never jumped from that high. We paid each of them the equivalent of about $30 to participate — which meant climbing up to the diving board and walking to its edge. We were as interested in the people who decided to climb back down as the ones jumping. We filmed it all with six cameras and several microphones. It was important for us not to conceal the fact that this was an arranged situation, and thus we chose to show the microphones within the frame. Ultimately, about 70 percent of those who climbed did jump. We noticed that the presence of the camera as well as the social pressure (from those awaiting their turn beside the pool) pushed some of the participants to jump, which made their behavior even more interesting. In our films, which we often call studies, we want to portray human behavior, rather than tell our own stories about it. We hope the result is a series of meaningful references, in the form of moving images. “Ten Meter Tower” may take place in Sweden, but we think it elucidates something essentially human, that transcends culture and origins. Overcoming our most cautious impulses with bravery unites all humankind. It’s something that has shaped us through the ages. -- Maximilien Van Aertryck and Axel Danielson are documentary filmmakers based in Gothenburg, Sweden, who have worked together since 2013. axel@plattformproduktion.se max@plattformproduktion.se
2016年2月8日
I was introduced to Jordan, the effervescent subject of this Op-Doc, by a mutual friend; we met for lunch at his favorite deli in Los Angeles, where we live. That day, we waded through a getting-to-know-you conversation that somehow felt both more awkward and less awkward than most of its kind. Jordan has Asperger’s syndrome, and so he often gets pulled into his own world, one that can seem chaotic and isolated from ours. But he has learned to make deliberate choices to stay present in reality. I found myself pleasantly surprised by the quick-witted middle-aged man having lunch across from me. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of music and movies, and a strikingly clever sense of humor. So I was intrigued. The lunch became the first of many meetings we shared over the course of many months, before we started filming this Op-Doc more than a year later. Autism and Asperger’s syndrome, which is often considered a high-functioning form of autism, can manifest through a wide spectrum of symptoms; the severity and range of consequences vary depending on the individual. Sometimes these symptoms are barely noticeable, but on the other hand, around 40 percent of autistic children do not speak. (Symptoms often lessen by adulthood.) In Jordan’s case, he lives independently, holds a job, and manages his own personal finances. He has a relationship with a woman named Toni who has multiple disabilities herself. But more importantly, he is self-aware, self-accepting, caring, with a strong ability to analyze and speak about his condition with others. He understands how he is different, and he has created a coping mechanism for himself that enables him to function in society and pursue his interests in the arts as an escape when it all becomes too much for him. It is these qualities that I wanted to emphasize in this film. I wanted Jordan himself to tell us his story instead of it being formulated out of impressions from the perspective of an outsider. A strong self-advocate, Jordan argues that he is not a disabled person, but merely a person with a disability. Someone from whom those he calls “normal people” could learn. Besides, he will argue, “everybody is not completely normal” anyway. So much more research and support is needed to enable people with autism. There are no limits to what beautiful minds like Jordan’s can help us make of this world. Official Selection SXSW Film Festival 2017. Official Selection Camerimage Film Festival 2016. Official Selection Santa Barbara International Film Festival 2017. Official Selection Cinequest International Film & VR Festival 2017. (Winner Best Short Documentary) Official Selection Oxford International Film Festival 2017. Official Selection Raw Film Festival 2017. Official Selection Athens Film + Video Festival 2017. Official Selection Newport Beach Film Festival 2017.
4月24日